Avi Lewis and Naomi Klein’s inspirational documentary shows how, “after Argentina’s economic meltdown in the late 1990s, groups of unpaid and unemployed factory workers decided to take matters into their own hands. Since the amount they were owed in wages roughly corresponded to the value of their employers’ material assets, the workers thought it fair to take control of the factories and resume production without permission. The bosses call it thievery, the factory workers call it expropriation . . .”
The Guardian

Discussions will be led by Bob Cannell, a long-standing advocate of worker co-operatives and member of Suma, one of the largest worker co-operatives in the UK.

£2 entry to film

Film starts at 7.45 and will be followed by discussion and drinks.

 

On 1 January 1994, the day the North American Free Trade Agreement came into effect, several thousand Mayan peasant soldiers took over half the state of Chiapas in Southeastern Mexico, declaring a war against the global corporate power they say rules Mexico. They called themselves the Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN). With exclusive access and interviews with the EZLN’s spokesperson Subcomandante Marcos, as well as Noam Chomsky and others, the film is the definitive look at the Zapatista uprising, its historical roots and its lessons for the present and the future.

The film will be introduced by Japhy Wilson of the Zapatista Solidarity Campaign.

£2 entry to film

Film starts at 7.45 and will be followed by discussion and drinks.

Thorough archival footage and interviews, this fascinating film documents the violent campaign of the Weather Underground, a faction of young protestors in 1960s and ‘70s US frustrated by the seemingly ineffectual methods of peaceful protest. It covers the whole violent campaign – from streets riots and bombings to eventual disillusionment and repression by the FBI. The Weather Underground raises difficult questions about protest, violence and political change that are as timely now as ever.

Discussions will be led by M A Branes-Wynters (aka barney doodlebug)

£2 entry to film

Film starts at 7.45 and will be followed by discussion and drinks.

12:08pm on the 22 December 1989 was the moment of Ceausescu’s fall from power in Romania. 16 years on, a TV talk show commemorates the event by asking local heroes to reminisce about the revolution. But without any suitable guests the producer is left with a drink-addled history teacher and a retired, lonely sometime-Santa Claus. The men’s fanciful boasts of rebellious glory are hilariously disputed by phone-ins from viewers who recall an altogether different version of events. The film sharply satirises the short memories and inconsistencies of post-revolutionary Romania.

Discussion will be led by Paul A Taylor, Senior Lecturer in Communication Studies, Leeds Uni, and editor of International Journal of Zizek Studies.

£2 entry to film

Film starts at 7.45and will be followed by discussion and drinks.