What does the energy harnessed through orgasm have to do with the state of communist Yugoslavia circa 1971? Only counterculture filmmaker extraordinaire Dusan Makavejev has the answers (or the questions). His surreal documentary-fiction collision WR: Mysteries of the Organism begins as an investigation into the life and work of controversial psychologist and philosopher Wilhelm Reich and then explodes into a free-form narrative of a beautiful young Slavic girl’s sexual liberation. Banned upon its release in the director’s homeland, the art-house smash WR is both whimsical and bold in its blending of politics and sexuality.

Dusan Makavejev, Yugoslavia, 1971, 84 mins

Born in Flames is a 1983 documentary-style feminist science fiction film by Lizzie Borden that explores racism, classism, sexism and heterosexism in an alternative United States Socialist Democracy. Among the feminist voices in the film are two contrasting pirate radio stations and a Women’s Army. It is a classic feminist film that tries to imagine sexual politics differently, but offers no simple solutions.

Lizzie Borden, 1983, United States

A young zombie named Otto appears on a remote highway. He has no idea where he came from or where he is going. After hitching a ride to Berlin and nesting in an abandoned amusement park, he begins to explore the city. Soon he is discovered by underground filmmaker Medea Yarn, who begins to make a documentary about him with the support of her girlfriend, Hella Bent, and her brother Adolf, who operates the camera.

Meanwhile, Medea is still trying to finish Up with Dead People, the epic political-porno-zombie movie that she has been working on for years. She convinces its star, Fritz Fritze, to allow the vulnerable Otto to stay in his guest bedroom. When Otto discovers that he has a wallet that contains information about his past, before he was dead, he begins to remember details about his ex-boyfriend, Rudolf. He arranges to meet him at the schoolyard where they met, with devastating results.

The film starts at 7.45 and is followed by discussion.

Harvey Milk was an outspoken human rights activist and one of the first openly gay U.S. politicians elected to public office.

Even after his assassination in 1978, he continues to inspire disenfranchised people around the world.

This Oscar-winning documentary directed by Robert Epstein, was one of the first to address gay life in America.

The exhilarating trove of original documentary material and archival footage is as much a vivid portrait of a time and place (San Francisco’s historic Castro District in the seventies) as a testament to a political visionary.
The films starts at 7.45 and will be followed by discussion.

Entry to film £3 or £2 for unwaged, low waged, students or OAPs.